Events Calendar

Cornish Language Course (Session I)

Wednesday, July 24, 2013, 5–8 pm

Benjamin Bruch, a world-renowned authority on Celtic studies, will present the first in a series of four courses on the Cornish language. At the far southwestern tip of Great Britain lies Cornwall: a small but proud country rich in history, tradition and folklore. Although nowadays Cornwall is sometimes described as a part of England, the Cornish have not forgotten that their land is a nation in its own right, home to a Celtic culture and a Celtic language that set its people apart from their English neighbors. Like many places in Britain, Cornwall has its own dialect of English, and many people there still use dialect words or speak with a Cornish accent. But Kernewek, the Cornish language, is something else entirely: like Irish, Gaelic and Welsh, Cornish is a Celtic language, as different from English as French, German or Russian.

Bruch was made a Bard of the Cornish Gorsedd in 1998 and played a key role in developing the new standard spelling system for Cornish, which was adopted in 2008. A graduate of the department of Celtic languages and literature at Harvard University, he has taught Cornish and other Celtic languages to students of all ages at schools, colleges and cultural events in the United States, Great Britain, Germany and Austria.

While it is hoped that participants will be able to attend all four sessions, the course is structured so that each session will include a review of all previous material as well as adding new material. As a result, even students who can only attend a single session will be able to acquire a basic knowledge of contemporary spoken Cornish. All participants will also receive a course pack containing handouts, lessons and other Cornish language resources. The next session will be conducted on August 14.

Ticket Info:

$30 per person. Download a registration form and registration instructions (PDF 41 KB).

Location Info:
Venue: Pendarvis

Nestled on a rocky, wooded hillside, Pendarvis comprises six historic stone and stone-and-log cottages built by immigrant Cornish miners in the 1830s and '40s during the Wisconsin Territory's lead-mining boom. Nearby Merry Christmas Mine Hill still bears the signs of early mining activity, and a 43-acre restored prairie reveals the unspoiled wilderness found by the first arriving settlers.

114 Shake Rag St
Mineral Point, WI

Contact Info:
Email: pendarvis@wisconsinhistory.org
Phone: 608-987-2122
Fax: 608-987-3738





Label