Cool off with Summer Saturdays!

Get a free water bottle when you visit during our giveaways on June 4, July 2 or August 6.
Visit early – this offer is only valid while supplies last!

Cool off with Summer Saturdays!

Get a free water bottle when you visit during our giveaways on June 4, July 2 or August 6.
Visit early – this offer is only valid while supplies last!

In this sepia tinted historic photo Bob & Edgar stand outside of Pendarvis looking casual

Discover Wisconsin’s Cornish
History and the Couple
Who Helped Preserve It

Every building tells a story, and at Pendarvis, there are plenty, each with a unique narrative to tell. Your journey through this picturesque cluster of stone structures not only tells the stories of the people who originally created and inhabited them, but also that of Bob and Edgar who salvaged, restored, and made these buildings shine again.

Tucked away in a valley in historic Mineral Point, Pendarvis celebrates the groundbreaking community of the first Wisconsin “badgers.” As you approach this charming neighborhood, the 19th century will instantly come alive through the quintessential limestone buildings and cozy nooks. Unearth the significant lead and zinc mining heritage of Wisconsin and get a taste of life as a miner in the young Badger State.

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Mark Your Calendar

Summer Saturdays

June 4 | July 2 | August 6

Cool off and #ExploreWisconsinHistory with us!

Get a water bottle when you visit Pendarvis on the first Saturday in June, July or August. Free gift can be picked up at the admission counter upon arrival. One gift per household.

Visit early – offer valid while supplies last!

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Pendarvis

Pendarvis

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Tucked away in historic Mineral Point, Pendarvis celebrates the 20th century preservation efforts of

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June is Pride Month! During their younger years, Pendarvis founders Bob Neal and Edgar Hellum both had mentors who were gay and who encouraged an interest in the fine arts, music, design, and food.

Edgar’s mentor was Ralph Warner who lived at the House Next Door in Cooksville, a community of early Yankee settlers near Stoughton. Warner bought his two story 1840s brick home in 1911, and started restoring it and filling it with early Wisconsin antiques. In the coming years, Warner became known for his expertise on antiques, gardens, and hospitality.

Warner encouraged Edgar to buy his own historic home in Cooksville to restore, which he did. Edgar’s trip to Mineral Point in 1934 to buy building materials, at which time he was introduced to Bob, was for this home. Comparisons between Warner’s business model at the House Next Door and Bob and Edgar’s at Pendarvis are clear. Warner served food, entertained visitors, and sold antiques in Cooksville, which Bob and Edgar replicated at Pendarvis. Warner was instrumental in preserving early Yankee settlement history in Wisconsin, as Bob and Edgar were with Cornish history at Pendarvis.

The connections Warner established helped build an early network of gay men in Wisconsin. To learn more about Warner’s life and his relationship with Edgar, plus more gay history in Wisconsin, check out Dick Wagner’s book We’ve Been Here All Along, and Will Fellow’s A Passion to Preserve: Gay Men as Keepers of Culture: shop.wisconsinhistory.org/pride

📸 Ralph Warner's House Next Door, WHI Image 30032
📸 Edgar's home in Cooksville in 1934, Pendarvis Archives
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2 weeks ago
June is Pride Month! During their younger years, Pendarvis founders Bob Neal and Edgar Hellum both had mentors who were gay and who encouraged an interest in the fine arts, music, design, and food.

Edgar’s mentor was Ralph Warner who lived at the House Next Door in Cooksville, a community of early Yankee settlers near Stoughton. Warner bought his two story 1840s brick home in 1911, and started restoring it and filling it with early Wisconsin antiques. In the coming years, Warner became known for his expertise on antiques, gardens, and hospitality. 

Warner encouraged Edgar to buy his own historic home in Cooksville to restore, which he did. Edgar’s trip to Mineral Point in 1934 to buy building materials, at which time he was introduced to Bob, was for this home. Comparisons between Warner’s business model at the House Next Door and Bob and Edgar’s at Pendarvis are clear. Warner served food, entertained visitors, and sold antiques in Cooksville, which Bob and Edgar replicated at Pendarvis. Warner was instrumental in preserving early Yankee settlement history in Wisconsin, as Bob and Edgar were with Cornish history at Pendarvis.          

The connections Warner established helped build an early network of gay men in Wisconsin. To learn more about Warner’s life and his relationship with Edgar, plus more gay history in Wisconsin, check out Dick Wagner’s book We’ve Been Here All Along, and Will Fellow’s A Passion to Preserve: Gay Men as Keepers of Culture: https://shop.wisconsinhistory.org/pride

📸 Ralph Warners House Next Door, WHI Image 30032
📸 Edgars home in Cooksville in 1934, Pendarvis ArchivesImage attachment

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Looks like a real project!